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Top 10 Family-friendly ragtops

Top 10 Family-friendly ragtops

Want to enjoy the sunshine without leaving the family behind? Don’t worry if you can’t squeeze your brood into a two-seat roadster – here’s our pick of brilliant four-seater buys that look great and don’t cost the earth.

A very long time ago, an open car that could carry a whole family was nothing particularly special. Indeed, in the 1920s, it was pretty much the norm.

But as soon as car plants mastered the art of churning out welded steel saloons, the versatility of the chassis frame was lost. Four-seater convertibles rapidly became a side issue, labour-intensive modifications of mainstream cars sold in tiny numbers for largely sentimental reasons.

Eventually, though, there was a rebirth of interest in the 1980s, since when a large number of interesting iterations have come and gone.

As a classic choice, an open four-seater certainly turns a singular hobby into something that your entire clan can participate in – whether that’s taking the brood to a classic car event, summer pub-crawl transport for the boys in ‘the hood’ (you, strictly bitter lemon, at the wheel), whizzing the household off to the coast the moment Britain’s slate-grey cloud covering parts, or taking the wife/husband and kids on a sun-kissed driving holiday where baseball caps and sunglasses are a must.

We’ve chosen a wide spectrum of drop-dead gorgeous dropheads for you to consider, from tight budget to city bonus prices, that shows the true scope of what’s available for sensible money.

Land Rover Series III (1971-85)

What to pay

Concours £10,000, Good £7500, Usable £2750, Project £800

Price when new

£1002

Why you want one

Why you want one: the ride may be bone-shaking but the style is absolutely pukka and the off-road capability still astounding.

The last of the Land Rovers as God intended (oh, all right then, creator Maurice Wilks)’ you can cram quite a large family clan aboard one of these – there were three seats up-front and two pairs behind facing each other in the short-wheelbase (all 88 inches of it) model with a canvas top.

Our choice is the 2.25-litre petrol engined one because the racket and vibration of the diesel is best avoided; it’s rough and noisy enough as it is without making driving it on-road any less bearable!

The Series III, lest you’ve forgotten, improved on the SIIA, with a plastic grille and headlights now sensibly positioned on the front plane of each wing, as well as a vastly better dashboard and – to make everyday driving less of a battle – synchromesh on all four gears and more powerful brakes.

If you love your dog and the outdoors as much as you love looning around in classic cars, then there’s no experience quite like a Landie. The kids are going to love it too, and you can be confident it can stand up to any amount of mistreatment, from you or them. Wellies, woolly hats and waxed jackets at the double…

Specifications 

Engine

2286cc/4-cyl/OHV

Power

70bhp@4000rpm

Torque

120lb ft@1500rpm

Maximum Speed

68mph

0-60 MPH

29.1sec

Fuel consumption

16-22mpg

Transmission

4WD, four-speed man

Fascinating fact

The Series III survived virtually unaltered for 13 years until it was replaced by the 90/110 range in 1984, with its vastly less jarring coils replacing girder-like leaf springs.

Buying tips

The body, famously, is rust-resistant alloy, but wherever it bolts to the steel chassis rust there is likely to be corrosion caused by electrolytic reaction.

Steering on old Landie is a notoriously vague pastime; if you can detect ridiculous amounts of play then a rebuild is probably required.

Blue smoke: a few puffs and it’s just a leaky oil seal, continuous clouds and it’s worn piston rings and bores.

Non-standard seats are common, but check seatbelt mountings are MoT-compliant.

The petrol engine is sturdy, and noisy running might be merely tappets asking for adjustment.

Vauxhall Cavalier Convertible (1986-88)

What to pay

Concours £4000, Good £2500, Usable £1800, Project £750

Why you want one

It’s the rarest and most interesting of the early front-drive Cavaliers, all of which are gaining appeal as totemic 1980s motors.

About eight years after Volkswagen’s standard-setting Golf Cabriolet made its debut, Vauxhall would come up with a credible rival in its Astra MkII Cabriolet of 1987. In the interim, though, and anxious not to be left out of the renewed 1980s rush for fresh air, came this fascinating machine.

The two-door saloon edition of Vauxhall’s game-changing front-wheel drive Cavalier MkII had a short shelf-life, yet provided the basis for a chop-top executed by coachbuilder Hammond & Thiede, part of Germany’s Voll Group. Even then, the design owed much to a 1982 one-off designed by no less than Robert Jankel, founder of Panther, and additional design work was undertaken by Worthing-based consultants IAD.

H&T cut off the roof and built up a box-like storage compartment for the electrically-operated hood (black on all but the final cars, which had dark blue ones), eating into boot space but leaving an uncommonly decent amount of space for the properly sized back seats.

It was a responsive yet also thrifty convertible, and a good looker, but the cars were slowly handcrafted – for Opel as well as Vauxhall – and only 1265 Cavaliers were made before the Bertone-built Astra took over. Vauxhalls just don’t get more intriguing.

Specifications

Engine

1796cc/four-cyl/OHC

Power

115bhp@5800rpm

Torque

112lb ft@4800rpm

Maximum Speed

114mph

0-60 MPH

9.3sec

Fuel Consumption

26-32mpg

Transmission

FWD, five-speed man/four-speed auto

Fascinating Fact

Celebrity endorsements for any Vauxhalls are rare, but Harry Enfield was a proud owner of one of these as he emerged in the 1980s as a fresh-faced comic genius.

Buying Tips

Electric remote boot release was standard, but pressure on the hinges can cause damage to the panel.

‘Clutch gone’ could mean the car’s a bargain, as a competent mechanic can replace it in under an hour.

Rust in the top of the rear suspension mount has usually eaten through into the boot space.

Budget for a cambelt change immediately, so you can plan maintenance henceforth.

The hood was specially made for the car, no spares are available, and twisted frames can be costly to rectify.

Triumph Herald 13/60 (1967-71)

What to pay

Concours £7500, Good £6000, Usable £3500, Project £900

Price when new

£20,950

Why you want one

 It’s easy to live with, simple to maintain, lively, and a cool little car that gets admiring glances from postmen to politicians.

The Herald has been in the classic car mainstream since the late 1970s, which explains why there are plenty of survivors and a big support network. And these salient facts probably also explain why prices have never reached silly levels, despite the Herald’s charms.

With its separate chassis, lack of first-gear synchromesh, swing axle independent rear suspension and rack and pinion steering, the car is an odd hybrid of ark-like and acute sensations. We’d plump for the later 13/60 as it has bigger front disc brakes and a useful 10bhp power boost.

For short local trips with the family aboard, it’s a great little car, both responsive and light on fuel. As a country pub express, it really is splendid. When the sun goes in and the hood goes up, though, you won’t want to be in it for a gruelling drive home in a downpour, as it’s draughty, noisy and a bit skittish.

You could consider a standard 13/60 saloon with a generous, pull-back canvas sunroof. And there’s also the six-cylinder Vitesse, whose throaty exhaust note and vivid acceleration can truly be enjoyed with the roof down.

Specifications

Engine

1296cc/4-cyl/OHV

Power

 61bhp@5000rpm

Torque

 73lb ft@3000rpm

Maximum Speed

 84mph

0-60MPH

18.2sec

Fuel consumption

24-31mpg

Transmission

RWD, four-man + O/D

Fascinating Fact

It may have had its shortcomings but the Italian styling, by Giovanni Michelotti, assured the Herald huge desirability from its launch in 1959.

Buying Tips

Your top priority should be making sure the chassis is in good condition; even the best body will have to come off it needs replacing.

Wooden dashboards prone to blistering and sun-bleaching but are fairly easy to restore or replace.

An annoyingly vibrating gearlever is easily fixed with new linkage bushes.

If the car feels shuddery at speed over 55mph then the propshaft needs rebalancing.

Careful oiling of the front suspension trunnions is essential to keep them working properly.

Volkswagen Beetle 1302 Cabriolet (1970-79)

What to pay

 Concours £12,500, Good £8500, Usable £5000, Project £2750 

Price when new

 £to come

Why you want one

 The perfect synthesis of design purity and sun-worshipping style, and plenty quick enough for today’s speed-camera Britain.

While the rest of the world forgot about open cars for four people, the soft-top Beetle sailed on throughout the whole of the 1960s and ‘70s, including sporadic handfuls of UK imports.

Indeed, with coachbuilder Karmann manufacturing the bodies, an incredible 331,847 Beetle Cabriolets were built between the first, in 1949, and the final one on 10 June 1980, making it one of the most popular convertibles ever.

Our recommendation here is for the model with the biggest engine and disc front brakes. It’s easily the most suited to modern road conditions, such as you are likely to encounter on a weekend trip to the coast this summer.

With the top quality hood folded, there’s a bulky, pram-like growth at the back of the car that still shields necks from draughts. With it erected, the snugness and tightness puts its Minor and Herald rivals to shame.

The evergreen appeal of the Beetle means that Cabriolets never come cheap, and you need to do your homework so you don’t get misled into purchasing a recent conversion instead of one of the Karmann originals. But it is, of course, one of the easiest classics to use on a daily basis…just as long as you avoid patches of black ice.

Specifications

Engine

 1584cc/flat-4/OHV

Power

50bhp@4000rpm

Torque

 78lb ft@2800rpm

Maximum Speed

 80mph

0-60MPH

18.5sec

Fuel Consumption

26-32mpg

Transmission

RWD, four-speed man

Fascinating Fact

The 1302 tag was chosen for the big-engined ‘Super Beetle’ after Simca grabbed the 1301 name for its family hatchback.

Buying Tips

The hood is a complex and weather-tight affair, but shrinks with age, so a replacement will sooner or later be needed.

A compression test is a sensible thing to do – all four cylinders should give 100psi.

If the steering is reluctant to self-centre, it will probably be adjusted too tightly, so simple to fix.

Heater channels and the spare wheel well are frustrating rust hotspots.

Interiors are austere but comfy; front seats are prone to sagging but everything needed to revive them is widely available.

Morris Minor 1000 Tourer (1962-69)

What to pay

 Concours £12,000, Good £8000, Usable £4500, Project £1800

Price when new

 £710

Why you want one

 It’s a little chunk of The National Trust on wheels and a surprisingly enjoyable car to drive, despite its lack of oomph.

Here is the acme of the affordable and enjoyable classic British motor car. Minors are too familiar to all of us to ignite wild excitement, but as an evergreen runabout with charm and character in abundance, they run rings round most everything else equivalent from the 1950s, even Ford 100Es and Austin A30s, for handling, steering and comfort.

The final tally of Morris Minor Tourers built between 1948 and 1969 is a still impressive 74,960, and plenty survive.

However, we can only recommend loading up your loved ones and picnic hamper into the 1098cc model, made from 1962, which is the least gutless thanks to its 48bhp A-Series motor, and has the best gearbox and brakes, albeit always drums.

Parts and spares are a doddle to locate, and the Minor is easy to work on, although the convertible is even more rust-prone than the saloons, while the hood is of the more basic variety, so you’d better be prepared for a bit of moisture ingress in a howling gale.

Fixed rear side windows make this car more of a cabriolet than a true convertible (although us Brits would never use such a gratingly foreign term to describe it!), but the benefit is all the rays that the sun can beam down on you with the minimum of unsettling side buffeting.

Specifications

Engine

 1098cc/4-cyl/OHV

Power

48bhp@5100rpm

Torque

 60lb ft@2500rpm

Maximum Speed

74mph

0-60MPH

25.4sec

Fuel Consumption

34-40mpg

Transmission

RWD, four-speed man

Fascinating Fact

 The last Tourer was manufactured on 18 August 1969; it was the first variant to be axed, followed by the saloon in 1970 and the Traveller, van and pick-up in 1972.

Buying Tips

Quite a few of these cars can be post-production conversions; real ones have the panel above the windscreen spot-welded in place.

Check the strengthening metalwork on B-pillars and at either end of the dashboard for cracks and rust.

Inner and outer sills both rust. Waxoyl on new metalwork should keep them rot-free.

Parts supply for Minors is one of the best in the classic car world, but we’d recommend joining the Morris Minor Owners’ Club for advice.

If there’s a rattle coming from the front of the engine, it’ll likely be a loose timing chain.

Singer Gazelle (1956-62)

What to pay

 Concours £8000, Good £5500, Usable £3500, Project £1500

Price when new

 £943

Why you want one

 It’s an evocative slice of petit bourgeois one-upmanship that’s actually quite elegant and capable.

Yes, indeed, the Gazelle is an upmarket rendition of the Hillman Minx. The only fundamental difference was in the Series I and II models, which used up stocks of Singer’s super little overhead-camshaft engine but, from 1958 and the Series III onwards, it was Minx hardware all the way.

However, both the open Minx and Gazelle in the so-called Audax series had their standard four-door saloon bodies cut and shut into two-door convertibles by craftsmen working at Thrupp & Maberly’s factory in west London, so they were a bit special.

Both cars have the facility to adopt the ‘coupe de ville’ stance, with the fabric above the front seats rolled back while keeping the rear section covered for a canoodling couple or sleeping toddlers.

The extra hefty metal needed to ensure the Gazelle convertible doesn’t crease-up in an emergency stop means the car is heavy, and acceleration is lethargic to say the least. Still, the dragging seconds do allow you to drink in the slowly passing scenery. The trim and paintwork, assuming it’s all intact, make this a great period piece, and some of them even have twin carbs.

Specifications

Engine

 1494cc/4-cyl/OHV

Power

60bhp@4600rpm

Torque

 83lb ft@2300rpm

Maximum Speed

 84mph

0-60MPH

23.9sec

Fuel Consumption

25-29mpg

Transmission

RWD, four-speed man/three-speed semi-auto

Fascinating Fact

 The Series IIIC of 1961 has the biggest 1592cc engine, but convertible ones are very scarce, as they were dropped after just one year.

Buying Tips

Convertible Gazelles and Minxes have diagonal underbody bracing to keep them rigid; check it carefully for corrosion.

Front wings are welded on and replacing them is time-consuming, especially in aligning them to the front valance.

 The rare Easidrive and Manumatic automatic models are hard to find transmission spares for – best avoid.

Signs of a tired engine are smoke because of piston wear and unpleasant gearchanges thanks to worn-out synchromesh.

An infuriating rust trap is inside the rear wings; water seeps in under the chrome trim on the wing top and then rots them out.

Saab 900 Turbo Convertible (1986-93)

What to pay

 Concours £6500, Good £5000, Usable £2500, Project £900

Price when new

 £23,495

Why you want one

 It’s very fast and very cool as an ageing Yuppie icon from the time when turbochargers were as exciting as iPhones are today.

This car truly was a surprise from Saab, somehow the last carmaker on earth you’d expect to open its roofs to the elements.

Saab first showed a prototype as a concept car in 1982, and four years later it was on sale, built in Finland with some design, technical and components assistance from ASC, the America Sunroof Corporation. A prominent rear spoiler into which the high quality electric hood folded was part of the nifty design that transformed a 900 Turbo two-door.

Two very comfortable places are in store for adults in the back. It’s a handsome vehicle with top on or off, and the conversion certainly gave the, ahem, maturing 900 a brand new lease of life.

You were required to pay a big premium of more than 20% over and above the cost of a BMW 325i convertible, so this was strictly for the well-off when new. Ha – not so now! However, acceleration is rapid, with plenty of turbo lag to heighten the sense of urgent performance. You don’t have to gun it like a hooligan, though, and there is also a non-turbo 2-litre edition, which today would make a lot of sense because the turbo only adds complexity, worry and likely expense, and barely improves the Saab’s cruising credentials.

Specifications

Engine

 1985cc/4-cyl/DOHC

Power

175bhp@5300rpm

Torque

 201lb ft@3000rpm

Maximum Speed

 126mph 

0-60MPH

7.6sec

Fuel Consumption

23-32mpg

Transmission

FWD, five-speed man

Fascinating Fact

 This Saab really revived convertible interest in the 1980s, and helped hoods and conversions specialists ASC contribute to 1m ragtops worldwide by 2005.

Buying Tips

Raise and lower the electric roof; if there are any strange noises coming from the mechanism then it will probably be the hydraulics, which are costly to fix.

Check for signs of weeping oil and water around the head gasket; changing that is a 10-hour job.

Early turbochargers were air- (as opposed to the later water-) cooled, and routinely expire at 120,000 miles, instead of 150,000.

Gearboxes are troublesome and demand entire engine removal to repair. Look out for cars that have had new ones fitted.

Don’t be put off by non-functioning heated seats – the issue is usually a broken element.

Triumph Stag (1970-77)

What to pay

 Concours £16,000, Good £10,500, Usable £6000, Project £1800

Price when new

£1996

Why you want one

 Even after all these years, plenty of people would prefer one of these beauties to a modern car, with all its sensory pleasures.

Very much in the vein of the Mercedes-Benz SL, the Stag was a sporty car intended for enjoyment all year round. Which is why the concept hinged on a snug hardtop for the long winter months, and a canvas hood to make the most of what little British summer there usually is.

There’s no other British car quite like it for style, noise or character. The 3-litre V8 engine is as individual as the four-seater convertible body with T-bar roof, and it’s an eager performer with vats of low-down torque.

The Stag’s status as a long-standing classic rock is indisputable, and its stealthy ascent in values over the past decade reflects both its rarity and desirability. The majority of these cars still at large in the UK will probably have been restored more than once already, so there’s plenty of choice, although repairable wrecks must surely be thinning out by now.

The car’s notorious original engine flaws – its overheating nightmares and blown head gaskets – are well understood today. Sorting a Stag is easier than it’s ever been, leaving you more time for the enjoyment – breezy up-front but positively hair-tugging in the back with little chance of keeping the airflow at bay – of roof-down motoring, best to hear that fruity V8 burble.

Specifications

Engine

 2997cc/V8/OHC

Power

145bhp@5500rpm

Torque

170lb ft@3500rpm

Maximum Speed

 117mph

0-60MPH

9.7sec

Fuel Consumption

17-24mpg

Transmission

RWD, four-speed man/three-speed auto

Fascinating Fact

 We think of the Stag as staunchly British but the original idea, for an open-topped Triumph 2000, came entirely from the feverishly active mind of the marque’s favoured Italian design guru Giovanni Michelotti.

Buying Tips

When did the car last have a new radiator? Ideally, all Stags need a new one every 10 years as a matter of course, to keep a cool head (literally).

It’s often shoddy repair work to the A-pillars that’s the reason for sagging and ill-fitting driver and passenger doors.

Noisy bearings in the gearbox are a key indicator that the layshaft is wearing out.

If you suspect that the timing chain is rattling then bank on an immediate replacement to avoid a mechanical meltdown.

A notorious rust incubator can be found under the radiator, on the crucial front crossmember.

BMW 325i Cabriolet (1986-93)

What to pay

 Concours £7500, Good £5000, Usable £3250, Project £800

Price when new

 £12,475

Why you want one

 It’s hard to think of a more elegant car with its roof lowered than the factory-designed E30. Drives brilliantly too

The four-seater convertible was back with a vengeance in the early 1980s, when the vogue was to take a three-door hatchback, slice the top off, and then recreate the strength lost by cracking open the monocoque’s integral circle of virtue by welding in a substructure, including a hefty roll-over bar, around the centre of the car. The roofless VW Golf, Talbot Samba, Fiat Strada and Peugeot 205 were all created this way – effective, for sure, but the results could often look like shopping baskets on wheels.

It was left to the fine minds at BMW to do the job properly. Its engineers came up with a convertible second-generation 3-Series where the rigidity was artfully incorporated into the windscreen frame and lower body so no roll-cage was required.

And Munich went further still, designing the hood so it could be electrically folded away and concealed under a lifting metal cover. As a result, the open 3-Series had supremely svelte lines. It was also quite the performance car in 325i form, although as the years rolled by there were 2-litre six and 1.8-litre four models that were tamer but no less enjoyable to drive on a sunny day.

Specifications

Engine

 2495cc/6-cyl/OHC

Power

 171bhp@5800rpm

Torque

164lb ft@4000rpm

Maximum Speed

 135mph

0-60MPH

8.7sec

Fuel Consumption

22-29mpg

Transmission

RWD, five-speed man/four-speed auto

Fascinating Fact

Before BMW’s own convertible, there was a factory-approved E30 chop-top from coachbuilder Baur; the so-called TopCabriolet had fixed side window frames and roll bar, was made from 1983-91, and was available through dealers to special order. 

Buying Tips

On the electric roof frame, dirty rods are often the cause of breakages, rather than the electric motors themselves; if not that, then the gears might need attention.

Broken seatbelt clips are a recurring issue on old E30 of all types, but they’re straightforward to replace.

The areas around the rear light clusters and number plate lights are known rust zones.

Has the car been neglected? If so, a cracked cylinder head is a distinct and frightening possibility.

If the rear side windows rattle or whistle on your test drive, fear not: adjustment is easy.

Rolls-Royce Corniche (1967-87)

What to pay

 Concours £50,00, Good £40,000, Usable £25,000, Project £8500

Price when new

 £11,556

Why you want one

 There can be no more aristocratic way to arrive at any destination with hair slightly messed up and nose held high.

We were quite surprised to discover that this car is not as elusive as you might think, for more than 5000 examples were made over almost 25 years. Nevertheless, such open-air magnificence was not best suited to largely overcast Britain, so the vast majority of these sybaritic beauties are to be found abroad.

The deeply cosseting seats in this car are more like leather-covered thrones, and there’s plenty of room front and back to enjoy the sumptuous appointments. The wonderfully insulated roof is power-operated, natch, and stacks on a deck behind the rear seats under a matching fabric cover, providing an excellent barrier against a stiff neck at speed in the open.

The purchase price of a Corniche is, of course, only the start. Running one is an open sore on any bank account, and if you collect Nectar points then you’re in luck – the Corniche’s 6.75-litre V8 drinks tankerloads. But the experience is like no other motor car; indeed, you may feel the need to keep that hood fastened most of the time (most have air-con anyway) to cut down on the staring from passers-by.

Specifications

Engine

6750cc/V8/OHV

Power

 220hp@4000rpm

Torque

 250lb ft@2500rpm

Maximum Speed

118mph

0-60MPH

10.9 sec

Economy

14-22 mpg

TRANSMISSION

RWD, three-speed auto 

Fascinating Fact

 The Bentley equivalent of the Corniche I convertible, both of which were current from 1971 until 1986, is an incredibly rare beast, with a paltry 77 examples built.

Buying Tips

If not a full service history, then paperwork evidence that the car’s been looked after by a reputable specialist is what you should demand.

Broken electric windows are no mere trifle – taking the door apart to fix them is laborious and fiddly.

A replacement for the wonderful hood will cost a king’s ransom; grubbiness can be dealt with, rips or holes should be avoided.

It’s a heavy car to rein in, and needs new disc pads every 12,000 miles.

Doors, bonnet and boot are alloy, the rest is steel and as susceptible to rust as any contemporary Austin or Morris.

Modern classics for letting your hair down

Peugeot 306 Cabriolet

£500-3000

This was one of the last of a distinguished line of co-productions between Peugeot and Pininfarina before the Italians’ services were dispensed with and internally-designed Peugeots turned pug-only. The car was built by Pininfarina which, with its reputation for good hoods, endowed it with particularly sleek lines because the top disappeared when folded.

Audi 80 Cabriolet

£500-4000

Famous as the convertible in which Princess Diana used to coyly flutter her eyelashes at paparazzi, the 80-based Cabriolet had a long life on sale in the 1980s and enjoyed a solid reputation for good quality, although these cars can be remarkably expensive to put right.

Mercedes-Benz 300CE-24 (W124) Cabriolet

£2500-13,000

This super-stylish power-top Merc was current from 1991 until 1996, and is probably the best-built and most usable four-seater convertible from that period. You’ll struggle to find a good one that’s cheap but you will love the refined, safe and sumptuous way it goes about its business, with its 24-valve 3-litre straight-six.

Land Rover Freelander MkI Softback

£500-£8000

Sounding more like something you’d read on a long flight, the two-door Softback is a semi-convertible, with a large glass sunroof over driver and front-seat passenger, and a plastic, folding hood at the very rear to redden the necks of those in the back. An interesting design from the flamboyant Gerry McGovern, the Freelander Softback idea perished with the advent of the MkII, yet it’s already well supported by British Motor Heritage parts.

Rover 100 Cabriolet

£500-2000

A strangely forgotten vehicle, although an oddly attractive one, the convertible Metro and its Rover 100 successor had an electric roof that folded and stacked, pram-style. Protracted development delays meant the car’s moment passed almost before it was launched, and less than 1000 examples were sold in all.

Related articles

 

Guide to buying a classic convertible

Five of the most expensive convertibles. Ever.

Owner Restoration: First time Triumph

Must-attend events for the summer

 

 

 

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